Tag Archives: Fantasy

Young Mister Wugidgem Episode 7

Thanks for joining me for Episode 7 of Young Mister Wugidgem. Last week we rode along the river with James, Grace, and Amos to the triple-trunk tree, where they found several clues that could lead to the identity of the evil magician. We also heard from Mom that she believes Dad has real magical powers. Mom then took the clues to Charlie Connors of the FBI. Continue reading Young Mister Wugidgem Episode 7

Young Mister Wugidgem, A Young Adult Magical Fantasy

0DAF4A5E-2291-445D-8D89-AE8721FF6455

This Great Oak Tree appears on the cover of my new book, Young Mister Wugidgem. We’ll be going back in time to 1994, when Debby and Michael’s mentor, Mister Wugidgem, is thirteen years old. The paperback proof is on the way to me for final approval, and I expect it will be available by the end of August on my web site:  www.allanwchapman.com.

In the meantime, I have started podcasting the book, and the Prologue is going out today. Here is the link:

Direct Link to Young Mister Wugidgem-Episode 1-Prologue 

Please send me your comments. Thanks and enjoy!

 

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 24+MR. WUGIDGEM AND THE FACES OF FREEDOM-EPISODE 7

Stanford University Track
Stanford University Track

For three months now, I have incorporated a long run in my weekly training. In the past I would include easy runs, but they were not generally long. My focus was on short, fast workouts to increase my speed. More often than not, I would incur an injury sometime during the year, probably because I wasn’t allowing my body to fully repair muscle tissues broken down during the speed sessions.

I believe the long, medium and slow (including walking) runs over these past three months have boosted my fundamental muscle strength to the point where I can change my intervals distance from a minimum distance of 400 meters and higher to 300, 200, and even 100 meter repeats. I will pay particular attention to being sufficiently recovered over the next day, or more likely the next two days, before doing the next running workout.

This week I did pay attention to getting sufficient rest between my runs. On Sunday I went for my long run, with plenty of walking breaks. On Monday I walked for 33 minutes, going 1.6miles. On Tuesday I did a Tempo run. On Wednesday I played 9 holes of golf. Thursday I did 200 meter speed intervals. Friday I walked for 35 minutes, covering 1.55 miles. Finally, on Saturday I walked for 31 minutes, up a steep hill and back down, 1.5 miles.

The highlight of the week was Thursday. After the golf on Wednesday I was quite tired and my lower back was stiff. I’ve been playing golf weekly with some stiffness and fatigue afterward, but this was more than normal. I had more than a little misgiving about transitioning to faster speed intervals the following day.

I felt better in the morning, although I did not feel fully rested. But I did finally convince myself to go to the track, warm-up, and then decide if I felt up to it. I started with my slow walking and jogging 1 mile warm-up, followed by 7 minutes of stretching, and then two wind sprints. I felt pretty well, so I decided to start with four repeat 200s, and then see how I felt after those.

The workout went very well. I felt relaxed from the very first repeat, with my core relaxed, good leg turnover, high-pump arm action, and full toes push-off. I did the first four repeats at my 800 meter race goal pace, and then decided to do at least two more repeats, and perhaps two more after those. I continued to feel good, so I completed four more. I had done 8 x 200s twice earlier this year, but this workout was the fastest and my maximum heart rate was 21 beats per minute slower than during one of them and 15 beats slower than the other.

As I have mentioned before, this year I am focused on having one long and slow run each week, building slowly and resting sufficiently between running workouts to minimize the risk of injury, all too common in my past.

I would say now, “So far, so good.”

 

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 20 PLUS EPISODE 3-MR. WUGIDGEM AND THE FACES OF FREEDOM

 Direct Link to Today’s Audio Podcast:

December was a difficult month, which actually was probably a good thing.  First I had to deal with jet-lag after a down-and-back trip to Canberra, Australia.  Then I kept trying to run 200s and 400s at my desired 800 meter race time, which left me further exhausted.  After that, most of my running was easy, and the few intervals I did were at a slower pace.  And I had a lot more rest days because I paid attention to my fatigue and only walked, golfed, or rested when I didn’t feel up to running. 

Now it is January, and I feel more rested.  In fact, this week I have felt the strongest in months.  I was able to handle a long run, and then an interval workout in 2 consecutive days.  I am hoping I can build slowly, but steadily in the coming months. 

I have also been thinking about my next novel.  I have been quite disturbed by world-wide terrorism, murder, bigotry and greed, and I have been trying to understand the root cause.  I think about poverty, drugs and alcohol, insanity,  lack of education, being spoiled, sexual drive, and myriads of other circumstances contributing to the chaos in the world.

When I was doing my prayers and meditations this week, I had an epiphany that all of these heinous acts and states of being have to do with power.  Or more specifically, the lack of power.  I want to investigate further.  How does one gain power in healthy ways?  Is the best power external or internal? Is win-win really possible?

I have dabbled in this area in my thriller, Slaves On Horseback, and my children stories, particularly Mr. Wugidgem and the Faces of Freedom.  I have been podcasting the first 2 Episodes on iTunes, and I am including the link to the third Episode just below.  For those of you who have listened to the first 2 Episodes already, today we will March for Freedom in Maracaibo with Debby, Michael, their mother and Mr. Wugidgem: 

 

For those of you who want to start at the beginning, please go to:

DIRECT LINK TO MR. WUGIDGEM AND THE FACES OF FREEDOM-EPISODES 1 AND 2. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Wugidgem and the Faces of Freedom-Episode 2

Thank you for viewing this post.  I am continuing with Episode 2 of Mr. Wugidgem and the Faces of Freedom.  In the first episode we saw Debby and Michael hear of a YouTube video showing a resistance demonstration in Venezuela, and soon after they were teletransported to Carib’s farm, near where it was occurring.  Today we will follow them to Lake Maracaibo where head right into the action!

Here is the Audio Podcast link:

If you are interested in a print copy of Mr. Wugidgem and the Faces of Freedom, please go to Createspace, a Division of Amazon:

http://www.createspace.com/4138227

Thanks for listening!

Please subscribe to receive future episodes automatically.  Thanks!

Mr. Wugidgem and the Faces of Freedom-Episode 1

Welcome to today’s podcast and thanks for tuning in.  My favorite in the Mr. Wugidgem Fantasy Series is Book 5, Mr. Wugidgem And The Faces Of Freedom.  Today I thought I would repost Episode 1. Debby and Michael begin the day in Social Studies Class and finish it in a foreign country, several thousand miles away! 

In coming weeks I will be posting the balance of the episodes.

Enjoy!

 

 

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE17

On Iffley Road Track, Oxford 2 weeks ago

Click on this link for the Audio Podcast Version of the written word below:

Two weeks ago I stood in my street clothes on the Iffley Road Track in Oxford, England, where Roger Bannister first broke the four minute mile. I had resumed training, and became aware that I was way past due for posting on my running, writing, and traveling blog.

Since I last posted, I have had 2 eye operations. The first one involved an artificial lens that was implanted after my cataract afflicted natural lens was removed 13 years ago.  For some mysterious reason, on the flight back home from Frankfurt, Germany to San Francisco,  the artificial one decided to relocate and began to wander around my eye’s sclera instead of fixed under my pupil. Here a link to an eye diagram if you may just happen to be curious: 

National Institute Of Health Eye Diagram

My good eye was still 20/20, but I quickly tired of squeezing my 20/450 afflicted eye shut to see properly, so I bought a black patch for it and spouted a lot of Pirate “Arrrrrghs” for the next 10 days.  I was pretty grumpy.

Anyway the first operation went okay and when I went to the doctor week later I could see pretty well. But the very next day the lens decided to take another hike, so they had to schedule a do-over, 2 weeks later. 

As you might expect, those 2 weeks passed really slowly. The 13 year old lens gave up the ghost during the second operation, losing its connectors, so they doctor retired it to the open road and implanted a brand-spanking new one.  This time he not only sutured it in, he glued it in!  “That lens is not going to roam anywhere,” he said. 

So far, it hasn’t even hankered for greener grass.

Anyway during all the time, the doctor prohibited me to run, lift weights, play golf, or anything more strenuous than walking. So I walked, but it was hard when you are used to running.

So I finally resumed running just over 3 months ago, at the end of June. For the first 2 weeks I did nothing more strenuous than easy runs.  Then during the next 3 weeks, I introduced a 1x 5 minute tempo run and fast striding, along with an easy run each week.  I was resting 1 to 2 days between runs, doing only push-ups and crunches on the “off” days.

Then in August, I started a few interval sessions. Here is an excerpt from one of them:

“1 mile w/u (about 15 minutes); about 7 minutes of stretching (45 second bent knee stretches each leg, 45 second straight knee, turned-in foot, stretches each leg, 20 hamstring and quad full leg swings forward and backward each leg, 20 toe liftings and lowerings each foot); 2 x 20 step fast strides (4:51 seconds, rest 71 seconds, 4:50 seconds), rested 1:31, then 1 x 22 step fast strides in 10:52 seconds; rest 3 minutes, then 3 x 200 meters (45:11, 2:00 rest, 46:00, rest 3:30-the time it took my heart rate to drop back to 120, 42:94);  about 1.25 miles w/d in 20:42  Average HR 120, peak HR 159, burned about 450 calories.  These fast strides are about the fastest yet!” Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE17

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE17

On Iffley Road Track, Oxford 2 weeks ago

Click on this link for the Audio Podcast Version of the written word below:

Two weeks ago I stood in my street clothes on the Iffley Road Track in Oxford, England, where Roger Bannister first broke the four minute mile. I had resumed training, and became aware that I was way past due for posting on my running, writing, and traveling blog.

Since I last posted, I have had 2 eye operations. The first one involved an artificial lens that was implanted after my cataract afflicted natural lens was removed 13 years ago.  For some mysterious reason, on the flight back home from Frankfurt, Germany to San Francisco,  the artificial one decided to relocate and began to wander around my eye’s sclera instead of fixed under my pupil. Here a link to an eye diagram if you may just happen to be curious: 

National Institute Of Health Eye Diagram

My good eye was still 20/20, but I quickly tired of squeezing my 20/450 afflicted eye shut to see properly, so I bought a black patch for it and spouted a lot of Pirate “Arrrrrghs” for the next 10 days.  I was pretty grumpy.

Anyway the first operation went okay and when I went to the doctor week later I could see pretty well. But the very next day the lens decided to take another hike, so they had to schedule a do-over, 2 weeks later. 

As you might expect, those 2 weeks passed really slowly. The 13 year old lens gave up the ghost during the second operation, losing its connectors, so they doctor retired it to the open road and implanted a brand-spanking new one.  This time he not only sutured it in, he glued it in!  “That lens is not going to roam anywhere,” he said. 

So far, it hasn’t even hankered for greener grass.

Anyway during all the time, the doctor prohibited me to run, lift weights, play golf, or anything more strenuous than walking. So I walked, but it was hard when you are used to running.

So I finally resumed running just over 3 months ago, at the end of June. For the first 2 weeks I did nothing more strenuous than easy runs.  Then during the next 3 weeks, I introduced a 1x 5 minute tempo run and fast striding, along with an easy run each week.  I was resting 1 to 2 days between runs, doing only push-ups and crunches on the “off” days.

Then in August, I started a few interval sessions. Here is an excerpt from one of them:

“1 mile w/u (about 15 minutes); about 7 minutes of stretching (45 second bent knee stretches each leg, 45 second straight knee, turned-in foot, stretches each leg, 20 hamstring and quad full leg swings forward and backward each leg, 20 toe liftings and lowerings each foot); 2 x 20 step fast strides (4:51 seconds, rest 71 seconds, 4:50 seconds), rested 1:31, then 1 x 22 step fast strides in 10:52 seconds; rest 3 minutes, then 3 x 200 meters (45:11, 2:00 rest, 46:00, rest 3:30-the time it took my heart rate to drop back to 120, 42:94);  about 1.25 miles w/d in 20:42  Average HR 120, peak HR 159, burned about 450 calories.  These fast strides are about the fastest yet!” Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE17

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 9

Copenhagen Mermaid Side View From The Boat

This week has had its downs and ups.  Sunday had been a total rest day, so I felt ready for my cross training session at the gym on Monday.  The mistake was that I did leg presses and leg curls on machines instead of equipment-free exercises I usually do for my quads, hamstrings and glutes.  To make matters worse, I set the machines with higher weight than I typically to. 

The net result was that I was extremely stiff on Tuesday, particularly in my knees.  I did an easy 3 ½ mile run in the morning, but I didn’t play my typical 9 holes of Tuesday afternoon golf because I was so tired and stiff.  I had terrible pains along both tendons in the back of my neck, probably from straining with the extra weight on the machines at the gym on Monday.  Aleve didn’t help much.

I did feel better by noon on Wednesday, however, so I was able to add one more 200 meter repeat than I had been able to handle in previous weeks.  The average time for the 200s was slightly slower than those of previous weeks, but the rest interval between them was less than in previous sessions. My left knee was sore during the warm-up, but was fine during the repeats.  I was particularly pleased because I focused on relaxing my stomach core and shortening my stride, and I felt relaxed overall during the repeats most of the time.  I’ll have more on this in a minute. Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 9

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE

Third in the 800 meters – 2012 California Senior Games

As I was thinking about this new blog on Running, I wondered where to begin.  The answer fought its way up from deep in my subconscious:   “At the beginning, Grasshopper!” 

I thought about that for several moments, and then finally the ancient Latin admonition from the Roman Poet, Horace,  drifted into my consciousness:  “In medius res, or in English, In the middle of things.  So ignore these two paragraphs, and let’s begin.

I am aching from yesterday’s gym workout.  This flu is sapping my energy.  It can’t be the flu because my doctor says I had the flu shot last fall.  Must be some other flu, like STP, or some other three letter designated disease.  Anyway, I’m busy thinking up excuses why I can’t run today:  I’m still sick; my eye pressure has gone up; got to go to Church this afternoon….

Hold it!  I’ve really got to think up excuses why I can run today:  I’m feeling better today than I did yesterday; my fever is gone; I feel even better after a run.  Don’t go away; I’ll let you know which side won the argument… Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE