Tag Archives: running training schedules

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 24+MR. WUGIDGEM AND THE FACES OF FREEDOM-EPISODE 7

Stanford University Track
Stanford University Track

For three months now, I have incorporated a long run in my weekly training. In the past I would include easy runs, but they were not generally long. My focus was on short, fast workouts to increase my speed. More often than not, I would incur an injury sometime during the year, probably because I wasn’t allowing my body to fully repair muscle tissues broken down during the speed sessions.

I believe the long, medium and slow (including walking) runs over these past three months have boosted my fundamental muscle strength to the point where I can change my intervals distance from a minimum distance of 400 meters and higher to 300, 200, and even 100 meter repeats. I will pay particular attention to being sufficiently recovered over the next day, or more likely the next two days, before doing the next running workout.

This week I did pay attention to getting sufficient rest between my runs. On Sunday I went for my long run, with plenty of walking breaks. On Monday I walked for 33 minutes, going 1.6miles. On Tuesday I did a Tempo run. On Wednesday I played 9 holes of golf. Thursday I did 200 meter speed intervals. Friday I walked for 35 minutes, covering 1.55 miles. Finally, on Saturday I walked for 31 minutes, up a steep hill and back down, 1.5 miles.

The highlight of the week was Thursday. After the golf on Wednesday I was quite tired and my lower back was stiff. I’ve been playing golf weekly with some stiffness and fatigue afterward, but this was more than normal. I had more than a little misgiving about transitioning to faster speed intervals the following day.

I felt better in the morning, although I did not feel fully rested. But I did finally convince myself to go to the track, warm-up, and then decide if I felt up to it. I started with my slow walking and jogging 1 mile warm-up, followed by 7 minutes of stretching, and then two wind sprints. I felt pretty well, so I decided to start with four repeat 200s, and then see how I felt after those.

The workout went very well. I felt relaxed from the very first repeat, with my core relaxed, good leg turnover, high-pump arm action, and full toes push-off. I did the first four repeats at my 800 meter race goal pace, and then decided to do at least two more repeats, and perhaps two more after those. I continued to feel good, so I completed four more. I had done 8 x 200s twice earlier this year, but this workout was the fastest and my maximum heart rate was 21 beats per minute slower than during one of them and 15 beats slower than the other.

As I have mentioned before, this year I am focused on having one long and slow run each week, building slowly and resting sufficiently between running workouts to minimize the risk of injury, all too common in my past.

I would say now, “So far, so good.”

 

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 20 PLUS EPISODE 3-MR. WUGIDGEM AND THE FACES OF FREEDOM

 Direct Link to Today’s Audio Podcast:

December was a difficult month, which actually was probably a good thing.  First I had to deal with jet-lag after a down-and-back trip to Canberra, Australia.  Then I kept trying to run 200s and 400s at my desired 800 meter race time, which left me further exhausted.  After that, most of my running was easy, and the few intervals I did were at a slower pace.  And I had a lot more rest days because I paid attention to my fatigue and only walked, golfed, or rested when I didn’t feel up to running. 

Now it is January, and I feel more rested.  In fact, this week I have felt the strongest in months.  I was able to handle a long run, and then an interval workout in 2 consecutive days.  I am hoping I can build slowly, but steadily in the coming months. 

I have also been thinking about my next novel.  I have been quite disturbed by world-wide terrorism, murder, bigotry and greed, and I have been trying to understand the root cause.  I think about poverty, drugs and alcohol, insanity,  lack of education, being spoiled, sexual drive, and myriads of other circumstances contributing to the chaos in the world.

When I was doing my prayers and meditations this week, I had an epiphany that all of these heinous acts and states of being have to do with power.  Or more specifically, the lack of power.  I want to investigate further.  How does one gain power in healthy ways?  Is the best power external or internal? Is win-win really possible?

I have dabbled in this area in my thriller, Slaves On Horseback, and my children stories, particularly Mr. Wugidgem and the Faces of Freedom.  I have been podcasting the first 2 Episodes on iTunes, and I am including the link to the third Episode just below.  For those of you who have listened to the first 2 Episodes already, today we will March for Freedom in Maracaibo with Debby, Michael, their mother and Mr. Wugidgem: 

 

For those of you who want to start at the beginning, please go to:

DIRECT LINK TO MR. WUGIDGEM AND THE FACES OF FREEDOM-EPISODES 1 AND 2. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE – EPISODE 19

Stanford University Track
Stanford University Track

 

If you would like to listen to this Podcast, please click on this link:

 

Back at last!  I have been struggling to decide whether or not I was ready to compete on the track.  I have had some gratifying interval speed workouts at my goal 800 meter race pace, but every time I reduced the rest interval between my speed repeats, my heart rate really jumped up and would not drop to an acceptable level when I reached the end of the rest interval, before the next repeat.  I would have to extend the length of the rest interval until my heart rate was at an acceptable level.  I expect this to happen at the end of the workout, but this was happening after only a few repeats with the shorter rest between them.

Eventually I decided to run a 600 meter time trial at my goal 800 meter race pace.  I felt good during the first 200 meters, but I was quite a bit slower than my race pace.  I began to struggle during the second 200 meters, which was slower than the first 200.  The final 200 was a bit faster, but I not as fast as I thought I was going!

Anyway, I was well off my goal 800 meter race pace, which I needed to achieve to qualify for the 2015 Senior Games.  I decided not to compete in the qualifying Games this month, but rather continue to train in my steady, gradual, injury- free way.  I’ll race only when I feel ready, hopefully by next Spring.  It is difficult indeed to accept that the recovery time after surgery and the recovery time after strenuous workouts get longer and longer as we age.  What helps keep me exercising though, is that I still love to run, my blood pressure and heart rate are low, and my overall health is very good. Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE – EPISODE 19

Iffley Road Track-Oxford University

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 18

Thanks for joining me today for Episode 18 in my running, writing, and traveling blog. For those of you who want to listen, rather the read, here is the link to the Audio Podcast: 

Picking up on one of my comments from the last Episode, it is extremely difficult to see the fine line between health and injury. Last week I ran a 600 meter time trial to get an idea how close I was to running a steady pace at my desired 800 meter race pace goal. I felt I was getting close to being able to race a full 800 meters at my goal pace, based on the 200 meter interval times at which I had been running. Was I ever wrong!

I thought I was running the first 200 meters at race pace, but I was quite a bit slower than I expected. I picked up the pace, but even at the 400 meter mark, I was still behind my goal pace. I increased my tempo in the final 200, but still finished well off my goal.

I just looked back at my training log, and I see that I had done a difficult tempo run 3 days before, and only walked the following 2 days. Therefore I did have 2 days of rest between the runs, but I may have needed a third day of rest.

I also may have needed to do my 200 meter interval training at a pace faster than race pace and/or reduced the rest interval to less than the 2 minutes I was taking. This week I think I will just reduce the rest interval and maintain the 200 meter pace at race level. The last time I did intervals faster than race pace, while maintaining the 2 minute rest intervals, I sustained a glute injury that took a long time to heal. Reducing the rest interval should be less stressful on the tired muscles, with less risk of injury.

Stay tuned… Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 18

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE17

On Iffley Road Track, Oxford 2 weeks ago

Click on this link for the Audio Podcast Version of the written word below:

Two weeks ago I stood in my street clothes on the Iffley Road Track in Oxford, England, where Roger Bannister first broke the four minute mile. I had resumed training, and became aware that I was way past due for posting on my running, writing, and traveling blog.

Since I last posted, I have had 2 eye operations. The first one involved an artificial lens that was implanted after my cataract afflicted natural lens was removed 13 years ago.  For some mysterious reason, on the flight back home from Frankfurt, Germany to San Francisco,  the artificial one decided to relocate and began to wander around my eye’s sclera instead of fixed under my pupil. Here a link to an eye diagram if you may just happen to be curious: 

National Institute Of Health Eye Diagram

My good eye was still 20/20, but I quickly tired of squeezing my 20/450 afflicted eye shut to see properly, so I bought a black patch for it and spouted a lot of Pirate “Arrrrrghs” for the next 10 days.  I was pretty grumpy.

Anyway the first operation went okay and when I went to the doctor week later I could see pretty well. But the very next day the lens decided to take another hike, so they had to schedule a do-over, 2 weeks later. 

As you might expect, those 2 weeks passed really slowly. The 13 year old lens gave up the ghost during the second operation, losing its connectors, so they doctor retired it to the open road and implanted a brand-spanking new one.  This time he not only sutured it in, he glued it in!  “That lens is not going to roam anywhere,” he said. 

So far, it hasn’t even hankered for greener grass.

Anyway during all the time, the doctor prohibited me to run, lift weights, play golf, or anything more strenuous than walking. So I walked, but it was hard when you are used to running.

So I finally resumed running just over 3 months ago, at the end of June. For the first 2 weeks I did nothing more strenuous than easy runs.  Then during the next 3 weeks, I introduced a 1x 5 minute tempo run and fast striding, along with an easy run each week.  I was resting 1 to 2 days between runs, doing only push-ups and crunches on the “off” days.

Then in August, I started a few interval sessions. Here is an excerpt from one of them:

“1 mile w/u (about 15 minutes); about 7 minutes of stretching (45 second bent knee stretches each leg, 45 second straight knee, turned-in foot, stretches each leg, 20 hamstring and quad full leg swings forward and backward each leg, 20 toe liftings and lowerings each foot); 2 x 20 step fast strides (4:51 seconds, rest 71 seconds, 4:50 seconds), rested 1:31, then 1 x 22 step fast strides in 10:52 seconds; rest 3 minutes, then 3 x 200 meters (45:11, 2:00 rest, 46:00, rest 3:30-the time it took my heart rate to drop back to 120, 42:94);  about 1.25 miles w/d in 20:42  Average HR 120, peak HR 159, burned about 450 calories.  These fast strides are about the fastest yet!” Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE17

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE17

On Iffley Road Track, Oxford 2 weeks ago

Click on this link for the Audio Podcast Version of the written word below:

Two weeks ago I stood in my street clothes on the Iffley Road Track in Oxford, England, where Roger Bannister first broke the four minute mile. I had resumed training, and became aware that I was way past due for posting on my running, writing, and traveling blog.

Since I last posted, I have had 2 eye operations. The first one involved an artificial lens that was implanted after my cataract afflicted natural lens was removed 13 years ago.  For some mysterious reason, on the flight back home from Frankfurt, Germany to San Francisco,  the artificial one decided to relocate and began to wander around my eye’s sclera instead of fixed under my pupil. Here a link to an eye diagram if you may just happen to be curious: 

National Institute Of Health Eye Diagram

My good eye was still 20/20, but I quickly tired of squeezing my 20/450 afflicted eye shut to see properly, so I bought a black patch for it and spouted a lot of Pirate “Arrrrrghs” for the next 10 days.  I was pretty grumpy.

Anyway the first operation went okay and when I went to the doctor week later I could see pretty well. But the very next day the lens decided to take another hike, so they had to schedule a do-over, 2 weeks later. 

As you might expect, those 2 weeks passed really slowly. The 13 year old lens gave up the ghost during the second operation, losing its connectors, so they doctor retired it to the open road and implanted a brand-spanking new one.  This time he not only sutured it in, he glued it in!  “That lens is not going to roam anywhere,” he said. 

So far, it hasn’t even hankered for greener grass.

Anyway during all the time, the doctor prohibited me to run, lift weights, play golf, or anything more strenuous than walking. So I walked, but it was hard when you are used to running.

So I finally resumed running just over 3 months ago, at the end of June. For the first 2 weeks I did nothing more strenuous than easy runs.  Then during the next 3 weeks, I introduced a 1x 5 minute tempo run and fast striding, along with an easy run each week.  I was resting 1 to 2 days between runs, doing only push-ups and crunches on the “off” days.

Then in August, I started a few interval sessions. Here is an excerpt from one of them:

“1 mile w/u (about 15 minutes); about 7 minutes of stretching (45 second bent knee stretches each leg, 45 second straight knee, turned-in foot, stretches each leg, 20 hamstring and quad full leg swings forward and backward each leg, 20 toe liftings and lowerings each foot); 2 x 20 step fast strides (4:51 seconds, rest 71 seconds, 4:50 seconds), rested 1:31, then 1 x 22 step fast strides in 10:52 seconds; rest 3 minutes, then 3 x 200 meters (45:11, 2:00 rest, 46:00, rest 3:30-the time it took my heart rate to drop back to 120, 42:94);  about 1.25 miles w/d in 20:42  Average HR 120, peak HR 159, burned about 450 calories.  These fast strides are about the fastest yet!” Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE17

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE16

Stanford University Track-Another View
Stanford University Track-Another View

I have been reviewing my workouts since the beginning of the year, in an attempt to unearth progress and setbacks during this 5 month period.  Because of hernia and eye operations during the first half of last year, I had spent the second half of 2013 doing a lot of easy running.  I was injury free. 

In January of this year, I began to do some speedwork, but at a 2 mile pace, rather than an 800 meter one.  I was doing 200s, 300s and 400s, usually 4 or 5 repeats, with a 2 to 3 minute rest interval, depending on how I felt.  I got through January injury free.

At the beginning of February, I began to increase the speed of my repeats to my 800 meter pace and I dropped the rest interval to the 2 minute range, but still did 4 or 5 repeats.  I felt very good during these repeats.  On February 27 I felt excellent, having rested 3 days, but on the 4th 200 meter repeat, my left glute cramped at about the 80 meter mark, so I stopped.  I rested 90 seconds, then ran 100 meters at my slower 2 mile pace, rested 2 ½ minutes, and then ran one more 100 meters at the 2 mile pace.  I prayed I wasn’t injured too seriously. Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE16

Running, Writing, and Traveling For Life – Episode 15

 

Sunset In Cupertino, CA
Sunset In Cupertino, CA

We are back home in California now, and I’m having a problem with the plastic lens replacement for the cataract-ridden one in my right eye. It has slipped out of place and they can’t schedule the corrective surgery for 10 days. I can see well enough with my left eye, so I’m working on this blog installment.
As I mentioned last week, I have been repeating a list of positive affirmations daily for the past six months, and I thought now was a good time to pass on some observations to you. If you would like to review my original December 19th blog on this subject please click on this link:
Direct Link to Affirmations Blog 12/19/13
Vitally important to this positive affirmation process are these two positive affirmations:
1. I love doing my affirmations, and I repeat them every day.
2. Affirmations work to improve my life.

I changed the word “enjoy” in the original first affirmation to “love” which you see above. As I repeated the daily affirmations over time, I gradually realized enjoyment was morphing into love. I wasn’t simply enjoying the visualization process; I loved how my life was changing.  Thus I created the second positive affirmation:  Affirmations work to improve my life.

Let me share a couple of examples. One of my affirmations is: I enjoy doing my chores and I complete them easily, with a smile on my face. After repeating this positive affirmation every day for a few months, I realized that I was, in fact, finding pleasure and satisfaction in doing my chores. The most amazing thing was that I was completing the chore all at one time, and sometimes even with a smile on my face!  Previously I would allow other distractions to interrupt the completion of my tasks. I also have noticed that when I am relaxing and a chore opportunity comes up, I more often than not handle the chore right then.

Third In The California Games 800 meters-2012

Another example of positive affirmations working involves this one: I am a strong, relaxed, fast runner, and I push off with all my toes. I visualize sliding my shoulder back and down, relaxing my core, and pushing off with all ten toes. Historically, I was tense in both training and racing. During the last six months, I have noticed when I am running, more and more I am actually sliding my shoulders back and down, relaxing my stomach and quads, and really pushing off with all ten toes. I really see this when I am doing interval training – when I am able to maintain these actions, the repeat time is faster.

I don’t fully understand why the affirmations work. I do know that I have negative thoughts during each day, but it seems to me I am better able to dispel these negative thoughts and replace them with positive ones. Some people may say this is self-hypnosis or delusional. Whatever is it, I believe this process trains the sub-conscious to come from a positive place, with the result being positive action.

I also want to reiterate the importance of repeating often, “I love doing my affirmations and I repeat them every day.”  The negative part of your subconscious will bombard you with negative thoughts that affirmations are waste of time, they don’t work, etc.  After a few weeks these negative thoughts will abate, but they will still pop-up once in a while.

If you are interested in further readings on affirmations, here are some links:

Winning Mindset0001

Train Your Brain Hard0001

Psycho-Cybernetics from Wikipedia

Please send your comments/observations to: allanwchapman@gmail.com.

Thanks!

Please be with me next week for my next post.  My doctor has advised me not to run until sometime after my eye surgery, so I should have time to reflect on my training.  Perhaps a few pearls will emerge that will be of use to you.

 

 

 

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE – EPISODE 13

View From The Doris Duke Estate, Honolulu, Hawaii
View From The Doris Duke Estate, Honolulu, Hawaii

Welcome to www.allanwchapman.com!  This blog is primarily about running, with periodic travel episodes woven in.  Today’s post features travel to the Hawaiian Island of Oahu, including Waikiki, Honolulu, and Ko Olina.  The running update will come at the end.

In recent years, my wife and I have discovered the best travel bargains appear to be during the second week of December.  Hotels, restaurants, and car rental agencies all have told us this is a slow week.  The largest discounts have been at the hotels.  Even the airlines’ algorithms have permitted them to offer a modest discount this week. 

We spent the first night at the Royal Hawaiian on Waikiki Beach. 

Royal Hawaiian Hotel

We have stayed at the “Pink Hotel” previously during the peak season in a garden view room, but during the second week of December we were able to get an ocean front view room at the same rate as the normal garden view in peak season.

Royal Hawaiian Hotel Ocean View
Royal Hawaiian Hotel Ocean View

For dinner, we returned to the Azure, the hotel’s premier restaurant.  We had thoroughly enjoyed their prix fixe (tasting menu) on our previous visit this past March, so we were quick to choose this 5 course option again.  We were not disappointed.  Each course was an innovative, delectable creation.  The portions were modest and the serving pace was leisurely, so we were sated, not stuffed, when we finished the sumptuous meal.  Here is the menu: 

Azure Tasting Menu

At 7 the next morning I was the first customer down on the beach to reserve lounge chairs in the Royal Hawaiian roped-off section of Waikiki.  I reserved chairs 15 and 16, which we had liked during our March visit because they provided easy access to the Mai Tai Bar and Restaurant, as well as to the rest rooms.  

After breakfast we swabbed on liberal amounts of sunscreen (mandatory in the hot Hawaiian sun), and took the pool elevator which actually was the closest access to our beach lounge chairs.   

And we did lounge in our chairs, alternating between people watching and reading.  We spotted more tattoos than we had ever seen in our lives, with some of the people having little flesh showing between the tattoos.  We also looked out from time to time at the scores of surfers, paddling and waiting for good waves.  There were a few good ones, but I’m sure it was a disappointing day for most of the surfers.  The big surf came later in the week.  This was a very enjoyable, relaxing time for us, but after about 2 hours, the sun’s heat really cooked us.  We made the short walk across the sand, up the ramp and into the Mai Tai Restaurant. 

We had found a really good rate at the Marriott Ocean Club in Ko Olina a few days before we left home.  This is a time-share facility, but they do have units available to the public.  So, after lunch, we set out on the 22 mile drive to Ko Olina.  If you’ve ever been to Hawaii and watched the TV News, you know what we ran into on the H1 freeway.  The traffic was even worse than normal because the highway crews were working during daylight hours to finish repairs by the end of the week so they could enjoy their Christmas Holidays.  Anyway, it took us 2 ½ hours to make the 22 mile journey.         

A new Monkey Pod Restaurant has been opened since our last visit to Ko Olina.  We had discovered their Maui Restaurant earlier in the year in Wailea and had enjoyed it so much that we returned a second time.  The Ko Olina is only about a one mile walk from the Marriott, so we decided to hoof it there-no rain in the forecast.  We were rewarded with delicious meals.  My wife ordered the Saimin Noodles, with Kalua Pork, broccoli, green beans, bean sprouts, red onion, cilantro, mint and peanuts.  I had fish tacos with cilantro, cabbage, roasted tomato salsa, avocado cream, served on double corn tortillas.  I really enjoyed my entrée, but I must say I really, really liked the several bites of my wife’s Saimin Noodles more.  In fact, I ordered it when we returned a couple of days later and was not disappointed.  As good as the entrees were, the dessert was better.  They offer strawberry cream pie, banana cream pie, chocolate cream pie, and coconut cream pie.

The next day we headed back into Honolulu for a tour of Shangri La, the Estate of the late Doris Duke.  Based on the horrific traffic out of Honolulu the previous afternoon, we allowed 2 ½ hours for this trip.  We were facing a return trip to Ko Olina during the afternoon commute hours, so I was expecting the entire day to be stressful and disappointing.

Wow, was I wrong!  We sailed in, part of it in the high occupancy vehicle lane, so we reached the parking lot next to the Honolulu Museum of Art School in less than an hour.  We paid $5 for 5 hours parking and then hurried over to the Honolulu Museum of Art one block away. Because of no-shows, we were able to get the last 2 seats on the bus for 9 a.m. tour instead of the 10:30 a.m. we were booked on. 

The bus ride took about 20 minutes, climbing up Diamond Head Mountain, around, and down the far side.  We drove through the entrance gate, and then down the winding driveway to the front of the house.  As we disembarked, we gazed upon what appeared to be a small, simple and plain house.  It sure didn’t look like what we expected Shangri La to be. 

Doris Duke Estate Front Door With Camels
Doris Duke Estate Front Door With Camels

The bus load of us were split into 2 tour groups, with the first going into the house and the second to start in the gardens before proceeding into the house.  My wife and I were pressed into the second group and moments later we were through the garden wall door.  We look around and we realized that we were indeed in Shangri La.  To the far left we caught side of the tiered house, built into the side of the mountain, far larger than it appeared from the front façade we first saw.  To the right of the house, the Pacific stretched out from the bottom edge of the property.  Straight ahead lay the magnificent Mughal Garden, with Diamond Head Mountain rising behind it.  Shangri La is a beautiful estate perched on 4.9 acres of prime ocean front, downward sloping land.  The Garden is an emulation of the Royal Garden of the Mughal Emperors of India in the 16th and 17th centuries, which first impressed Doris Duke during her honeymoon there in 1935.

Doris Duke Estate Mughal Garden
Doris Duke Estate Mughal Garden

We retraced our steps through the garden wall door and then entered the house through a similar door, into the foyer.  Islamic art and written language abounded, expressing Doris Duke’s love for this ancient expression from the Middle East, India and Pakistan.  The entire house is designed around the Islamic theme.

Here are the highlights:

The Mihrab Room is a dimly lit chamber, which has as its focus a luster ceramic on one of the walls.  This is known as a Mihrab and orients Islamic worshipers towards Mecca, to which they pray 5 times daily.  The rest of the sanctuary features beautiful restored tile works and other ceramics.  

The Damascus Room is a re-creation of an opulent area where guests were received.  The walls and ceiling are wood, embellished with gold, tin, and copper, as well as multicolored glazes.  As I recall (photography inside the house is forbidden), the guests sit on a circular ottoman in the center of the room, and the hosts are seated along the walls.

The Living Room is bright, long and spacious, with a spectacular view of Diamond Head through a floor-to-ceiling window, which also runs the full width of the room.  Our guide told us the window could be totally retracted into the floor for unobstructed viewing of the Pacific and the Mountain. 

The Dining Room is a re-creation of an Islamic Tent.  The walls and ceilings are totally covered with striped blue fabric, which is embellished with Egyptian and Indian appliques.  A magnificent Baccarat Chandelier hangs from the center of the ceiling, and the south and west wall fabric panels can be raised to let views of the Pacific and Diamond Head into the room.  I really could imagine myself in a spacious elegant tent somewhere out in the Sahara.

As I mentioned earlier, I was really pleasantly surprised that I enjoyed this tour so much.  Doris Duke left her Estate for the public to enjoy, and I for one found it a real pleasure.  If you would like to learn more about booking the tour and more of what is there, you can go to: http://www.shangrilahawaii.org.

We spent 3 more days in the relative calm of Ko Olina (versus the Waikiki frenzy outside the grounds of the Royal Hawaiian).  We sat in the shade of a tree next to the beach, and then actually went into the Marriott Lagoon water for a few minutes.  We walked to Roy’s for dinner one evening and got caught in a downpour on the way back.  It does rain in Hawaii!  The next day the waves were up, so the surfers were finally happy!

I also did 3 x 5 minute tempo runs along the Hawaiian Railway tracks, which cuts straight through the Ko Olina Golf Course.  Continue reading RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE – EPISODE 13

Running, Writing, and Traveling for Life-Episode 11

RUNNING, WRITING, AND TRAVELING FOR LIFE-EPISODE 11

For the last several weeks, I have been doing a modest amount of running, but not feeling prepared to write about.  I’m still tired much of the time, and I’m stiff the days following the gym workouts, interval training and the tempo runs.  I’ve cut back to these two running days and one gym workout per week.  I do some walking and easy running on the other four days, but most of them are rest days.

But I really feel good when I am running, and for several hours after the workouts.  Some of this “feel good” phenomenon is the endorphins my body produces, but I think the majority is just the relaxed movement.  I think in former times, every stride was tense, and probably I had muscle groups working against each other.  Now I try to relax my stomach, keep my elbows tucked in slightly, shorten my stride, and land mid-sole.  I feel more fluid, and I really enjoy this kind of movement.  Perhaps I’m just fooling myself, but I haven’t sustained any injuries since I resumed training six months ago.  This is the longest I’ve ever gone after a layoff without injury.

Stanford Oval View Of The Quad
Stanford Oval View Of The Quad

Continue reading Running, Writing, and Traveling for Life-Episode 11